Course Change Recommended | My Cancer Journey


On Monday, I was able to complete the remainder of my magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan without further issue. Not surprising given that MRI imaging is an exceedingly safe technique with more than 30 million scans being performed every year in the United States. Nonetheless, my bizarre experience during Saturday’s initial attempt still left me a bit apprehensive.

MRI machines use strong magnetic fields and radio waves (radiofrequency energy) to produce images. In fact, the most considerable safety concern in the MRI environment is the effect of the magnetic field on medical devices, implants, and any ferromagnetic objects in the room (clips, coins, body piercings, steel oxygen tanks, etc.) can become very dangerous projectiles. This is why patients are carefully screened by a qualified healthcare professional even before entering the MRI environment.

Before Saturday, I was familiar with the potential magnetic field concerns of an MRI but unaware of the bio-effects of radiofrequency fields (RF) that can cause tissue heating in the human body. All of my prior MRI imaging took place on the tried and true 1.5 Tesla (1.5T) machines versus the 3.0 Tesla (3.0T) used on Saturday. A 3.0T MRI provides higher clarity and better detail because the magnetic field is twice as strong as 1.5T. Based on my recent experience, the stronger 3.0T MRI may have been just enough for me to sense the increased temperature in my chest and abdomen towards the end of the scan.

Regardless, given the differences between the 3.0T and 1.5T machines and not knowing what to expect in terms of a potential internal warming sensation likely resulted in my having a decent panic attack. Stuck in a tube and unexpectedly feeling like you could be boiled from the inside is disconcerting. Technicians already inform patients about what to expect once a contrast agent is injected as part of the MRI procedure. Going forward, additional disclosure to patients about other differences between T3.0 versus T1.5 might help patients avoid unnecessary anxiety.

While there wasn’t a dramatic progression of my cancer based on Saturday’s CT scan of my abdomen/pelvis, the overall picture looked different when combined with the results from the MRI of my spine and the increasing level of pain. Bottom line: a relatively rapid advancement of cancer in the bone occurred over a short period. Taxol alone isn’t cutting it; a change in course is recommended.

Accordingly, we are forgoing the last dose of Taxol this week (should have been dosed today…) and moving forward with plans for radiation therapy (RT) to the new tumor next to my T8 vertebrae. The goal of this round of RT is to alleviate my pain and potentially reduce dependence on steroids, opioids, gabapentin, etc.

In the background, arrangements are being made for me to be seen in the Early Drug Development clinic at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) to discuss a clinical trial option after I’m discharged from the hospital. Hopefully, this occurs on Friday, which represents the one week mark for my current hospital stay.

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